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Speakers


William Agace
William Agace

Our current interests are in assessing antigen presenting cell diversity, development and function in inductive (Peyer's patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, mesenteric lymph nodes) and effector (lamina propria and epithelium) sites of the human intestine and changes that occur within this compartment in the setting of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Ido Amit
Ido Amit

“The role of DC in tumor immunity” and “immunotherapy “.

Venetia Bigley
Venetia Bigley

Work in our lab investigates the genetic mechanisms controlling the haematopoietic development of human dendritic cells and how these are perturbed in disease. Patients with primary immunodeficiency, carrying single gene defects, provide unique models to interrogate the ontogeny and function of these cells.

A particular focus is the role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 8 (IRF8) as a pivotal regulator of innate myeloid cell development.

We are also harnessing insights from these patients to develop highly potent DCs for therapy.

Beatriz Carreño
Beatriz Carreño

Dr. Carreno's research has harnessed the basic knowledge in HLA, antigen processing and presentation, and T cell biology to discover actionable target antigens and introduce novel cell engineering methodologies.

Dr. Carreno's research is translational and thus she collaborates with other scientists and clinicians to bring unique and complementary expertise for the development of clinical trials with cancer vaccines and adoptive T cell therapies.

Hongbo Chi
Hongbo Chi

Our laboratory has a long-standing interest in understanding metabolic programs and nutrient signaling pathways underlying immune cell fates in adaptive immunity, including both dendritic cells and T cells. We explore these questions by integrative approaches including CRISPR screen-based functional genomics, single-cell transcriptomics, multiplex proteomics, systems immunology and network biology

Marc Dalod
Marc Dalod

We aim at determining how dendritic cell types and activation states shape antiviral or anti-tumor immunity. This includes better understanding whether, when, where and how plasmacytoid dendritic cells play beneficial versus deleterious roles in different pathophysiological conditions.

Jolanda de Vries
Jolanda de Vries

Autologous DCs, directly isolated from peripheral blood, loaded with tumor antigens and matured in vitro, can induce tumor-specific immune responses and clinical responses in cancer patients.

In preclinical models, a particular DC subset, conventional type 1 DCs (cDC1s) is shown to be specialized in cross-presenting extracellular antigens to CD8+ T cells. This feature makes them a promising DC subset for cancer treatment.

Florent Ginhoux
Florent Ginhoux

The focus of the laboratory is to understand the ontogeny of DCs, monocytes and macrophages, their differentiation pathways and how their unique ontogeny dictates their immune functions.

Defining macrophage and DC populations on the criteria of their origin may aid our understanding of their discrete roles in tissue immunity and homeostasis, as ontogeny of DC and macrophage subsets likely underlie their functional specializations.

Muzz Haniffa
Muzz Haniffa

Muzz's research is focused on studying human development primarily the developing human immune system and skin to inform stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and adult pathology. Her team leverages cutting edge single cell genomics, computation, stem cell culture systems including the generation of skin organoids as experimental models to study human development

Her research is also focused on personalised therapy including target discovery for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases primarily focused on skin.

Ping Chih Ho
Ping Chih Ho

Type I dendritic cells have been shown to orchestrate host anti-tumor immunity in multiple dimensions.

In this talk, I will discuss how the tumor microenvironment influence type I dendritic cell behaviour and reveal new features on orchestrating host anti-tumor immunity beyond cytokine production and cross-presentation.

Juliana Idoyaga
Juliana Idoyaga

Our lab studies the mechanisms used by dendritic cells (DCs) to mount different types of immune responses.

We integrate diverse approaches to study human and mouse DCs in parallel, with ongoing efforts focused on (1) origin and function of emerging DC subsets; (2) transcriptomic control of DC function; (3) functional specialization of tissue DCs; (4) DC contribution to diverse immune responses in human. Our pursuit of foundational principles of DC function is driven by the desire to develop promising biomedical applications that harness these cells, as illustrated in the (5) area of active research: DC function in cancer therapeutics.

Max Krummel
Bart Lambrecht
Bart Lambrecht

My lab studies how mucosal DCs, monocytes and macrophages contribute to induce and maintain type 2 immune responses. We discovered a division of labor and close collaboration between these cells and type 2 innate immune cells and epithelial cells, and apply this knowledge to better understand allergic diseases.

Ana María Lennon
Ana Maria Lennon

My lab has a longterm history studying the migration of dendritic cells by combining micri-fabricated tools with cell and tissue imaging.

One of our major interest has been to understand how migration and function of dendritic cells are coordinated.

Nicolas Manel
Nicolas Manel
The Manel lab investigates the mechanisms of intracellular DNA sensing in the context of viral infections, cancer, and aging.

Miriam Merad
Ken Murphy
Shalim H Naik
Shalim H Naik

Our lab investigates biology through the lens of clones using novel barcoding technologies and multi-omics.

This will lead to revised clone-centric models of haematopoiesis, where DCs emerge in this pathway, and the mechanisms that control lineage commitment.

We are also harnessing these findings to generate DCs for cancer immunotherapy.

Caetano Reis e Sousa
Caetano Reis E Sousa

We study innate immune receptors and signalling pathways that trigger DC activation and promote T cell priming or that generally act to modulate the function of DC.

Many of these pathways are shared with other cell types and are triggered in response to infection or cell death.

In a related research programme, we study DC and myeloid cell heterogeneity and ontogeny with a view to understand the role of distinct DC subtypes in mouse and in human.

Franca Ronchese
Franca Ronchese

Migratory type 2 dendritic cells are phenotypically and transcriptionally heterogeneous, expressing different markers according to the tissue in which they differentiate before migrating to the draining lymph node.

My Lab investigates how tissue environmental cues together with allergen signals condition type 2 dendritic cells to initiate allergic immunity.

Francisco Sánchez-Madrid
Francisco Sánchez Madrid

A perspective on our recent research on the function of the Immunological synapse as focal point to control organelles motion and T cell activation, and as a device to efficient transfer of information shuttled by extracellular vesicles will be offered. The consequences of antigen-cognate contacts on the fate of dendritic cells (DCs) after productive immune synapses (post-synaptic DCs, psDCs) will be discussed.

Roxane Tussiwand
Roxane Tussiwand

From their origin to their function. Our lab is studying the development and the ontogeny of dendritic cell subsets with the aim to define developmental cues of individual subsets and understand how these shape immune responses.

José Villadangos
José Villadangos

The laboratory of Jose Villadangos studies the cells and molecules involved in Antigen Presentation and T cell Recognition, events that underpin every activity of the adaptive immune system.

Ulrich von Andrian
Ulrich Von Adrian

The Von Andrian lab conducts basic research in immunology using a broad range of molecular cellular and whole animal approaches. We focus on the molecular mechanisms of immune cell migration and homing in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues using intravital microscopy techniques.

Elina Zúñiga
Elina Zuñiga

Our laboratory is interested in understanding the underlying mechanisms and consequences of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells lineage adaptations during a viral infection.

These adaptations include compromised pDC development from bone marrow progenitors, enhanced pDC-lineage conversion into conventional Dendritic Cells Type 2 (cDC2), and a reduction in pDC capacity to produce type I interferons, also referred as pDC exhaustion, among others.

IMPORTANT DATES
  • Abstract Submission
    • 30th May 2024
      Abstract submission deadline
    • Early July 2024
      Author notification of submission outcome
    • 31st July 2024
      Author registration deadline
    Registration
    • Early bird Fee
      Until 31st July 2024
    • Standard Fee
      From 1st August to 8th October 2024
    • Onsite Fee
      From 9th October 2024 onwards